3D print your own Rubik’s Cube Solver

Why use logic and your hands to solve a Rubik’s Cube, when you could 3D print your own Rubik’s Cube Solver and thus avoid overexerting your fingers and brain cells? Here to help you with this is Otvinta‘s new robotic make:

Fully 3D-Printed Rubik’s Cube Solving Robot

This 3D-printed Raspberry PI-powered Rubik’s Cube solving robot has everything any serious robot does — arms, servos, gears, vision, artificial intelligence and a task to complete. If you want to introduce robotics to your kids or your students, this is the perfect machine for it. This robot is fully 3D-printable.

Rubik’s Cubes

As Liz has said before, we have a lot of Rubik’s cubes here at Pi Towers. In fact, let me just…hold on…I’ll be right back.

Okay, these are all the ones I found on Gordon’s desk, and I’m 99% sure there are more in his drawers.

Raspberry Pi Rubik's Cube Solver

And that’s just Gordon. Given that there’s a multitude of other Pi Towers staff members who are also obsessed with the little twisty cube of wonder, you could use what you find in our office to restock an entire toy shop for the pre-Christmas rush!

So yeah, we like Rubik’s Cubes.

The 3D-Printable Rubik’s Cube Solver

Aside from the obvious electronic elements, Otvinta’s Rubik’s Cube Solving Robot is completely 3D-printable. While it may take a whopping 70 hours of print time and a whole spool of filament to make your solving robot a reality, we’ve seen far more time-consuming prints with a lot less purpose than this.

(If you’ve clicked the link above, I’d just like to point out that, while that build might be 3D printing overkill, I want one anyway.)

Rubik's Cube Solver

After 3D printing all the necessary parts of your Rubik’s Cube Solving Robot, you’ll need to run the Windows 10 IoT Core on your Raspberry Pi. Once connected to your network, you can select the Pi from the IoT Dashboard on your main PC and install the RubiksCubeRobot app.

Raspberry Pi Rubik's Cube Solver

Then simply configure the robot via the app, and you’re good to go!

You might not necessarily need a Raspberry Pi to create this build, since you could simply run the app on your main PC. However, using a Pi will make your project more manageable and less bulky.

You can find all the details of how to make your own Rubik’s Cube Solving Robot on Otvinta’s website, so do make sure to head over there if you want to learn more.

All the robots!

This isn’t the first Raspberry Pi-powered Rubik’s Cube out there, and it surely won’t be the last. There’s this one by Francesco Georg using LEGO Mindstorms; this one was originally shared on Reddit; Liz wrote about this one; and there’s one more which I can’t seem to find but I swear exists, and it looks like the Eye of Sauron! Ten House Points to whoever shares it with me in the comments below.

The post 3D print your own Rubik’s Cube Solver appeared first on Raspberry Pi.


Source: RaspberryPi – IOT Anonimo

Source: Privacy Online


Source: Zologic

New York's Historic FinSec Regulation Covers DDoS, Not Just Data

Starting today, New York banks and insurers must report to authorities within 72 hours on any security event that has a ‘reasonable likelihood’ of causing material harm to normal operations.
Source: Vulnerabilitys & Threats

Reinvent the In-store Experience by Unlocking the Power of Data-driven Insights

Shopper behavior and spending habits are changing dramatically, causing the retail industry to face a period of significant disruption. As shoppers are empowered by mobile devices, social media and the Internet, they expect retail experiences that combine choice, convenience, superior service, and a clear understanding of their individual preferences. This shift has been heavily influenced by online giant Amazon and other similar companies, which use data-driven insights about product preferences and spending patterns to provide shoppers with enhanced experiences by giving them what they want, when they want it.

This intimate customer knowledge and the effective use of data and technology are paying big dividends for online merchants. Roughly eight in 10 Americans (79 percent) are now online shoppers, up from just 22 percent in June 2000, and 82 percent say they consult online ratings and reviews when buying something for the first time. While online shopping frequently offers lower prices, greater convenience, and many other benefits that brick-and-mortar retailers are struggling to match, 64 percent of Americans say that, all things being equal, they prefer buying from physical stores to shopping online.

With RFID technology, brick-and-mortar retailers can use this preference to their advantage by bringing the best of both the physical and online worlds to their customers, while answering all those age-old questions: How do I keep good track of my inventory? How can I provide a better customer experience to my customers? How do I optimize my workforce to get maximum effect on my bottom line?

Many retailers have reaped the benefits of RFID by taking that critical first step to implement RFID solutions in their stores. When it comes to choosing the right type of RFID investment—fixed/overhead or handheld—retailers should be careful of implementing a handheld solution that’s too basic and does not provide them with the complete picture. Fixed RFID solutions deliver maximum value to the retailer by not just providing ROI stemming from more accurate inventory levels, but through automating many of the store operations to enable associates to focus more attention on the brand, the product, and—most importantly—the customer.

Overhead RFID unlocks a wealth of data in the store, providing information and insight on customer preferences and interaction with product previously relegated to the online shopping space alone. While we are glad that retailers are exploring RFID in their stores, years of research and development in the smart retail space tells us only investing in the right technology will deliver the results and the value in today’s shopping environment. So what is the right option—overhead or handheld?

A person folds a sweater.
Overhead vs. handheld RFID

Overhead RFID has many advantages over handhelds, but in actuality, retailers don’t have to choose one over the other. There is a way to have the best of both worlds, and the most successful deployments will find the right mixture of both solutions. While many retailers may opt for a handheld first with some fixed sensors over portals or a point-of-sale approach due to what can sometimes be perceived as a lower cost barrier and more simplicity (a misconception addressed in a previous blog on RFID technology blog), this can result in a failed attempt to reap upfront benefits while minimizing the investment needed to implement a full overhead solution.

What this strategy also doesn’t address is the fact that consumer shopping patterns and behaviors are always changing, and the way products are placed throughout the store should reflect this reality. A portal might help to determine when an item moves from back stock to the sales floor or when it leaves the store, but where the item is in between those events will remain a mystery.

The winning approach: Augmenting a fixed solution with handhelds

Static point-of-sale stations have existed in retail since the first store ever opened, but—as Intel is deeply familiar with this—brick-and-mortar retailers find themselves at a crossroads with how they deal with online competition. Retailers continue to invest in mobile POS solutions, enabling store associates to assist customers anywhere in the store and reduce the friction of checkout. Many also aim to enable a frictionless self-checkout in the future. In this scenario, when and where the customer transaction takes place in the store is very much to be determined.

Even in a fixed RFID deployment that provides retailers with the real-time data they need, a handheld sensor may sometimes be necessary to search for exceptions in the store. But leading with a handheld solution supplemented with transition-based (portal) sensors will fall short of unlocking the full potential of RFID benefits since it will fail to provide retailers with the store coverage and real-time data ingestion they truly need. Augmenting a fixed solution with handhelds is the true winning approach: It will not only provide retailers with proper store coverage, it’ll give them real-time data ingestion too, hence providing e-commerce quality insights.

Intel Responsive Retail Sensor infographic

Intel RRS

A product like the Intel Responsive Retail Sensor (Intel RRS) could provide a viable long-term solution to retailers, as it delivers accurate, always-on, real-time data that gives brick-and-mortar retailers the best of both worlds—combining the convenience, speed, and selection of online shopping with the person-to-person service and opportunities for customers to touch and try on products that only brick-and-mortar stores provide. Using innovative technology solutions and data-driven insights to bring the advantages of online shopping into their physical locations enables retailers to transform their businesses and reinvent the in-store customer experience.

Visit intel.com/retail to learn more about how Intel technology is shaping the future of responsive retail. To stay informed about Intel IoT developments, subscribe to our RSS feed for email notifications of blog updates, or visit intel.com/IoTLinkedInFacebook and Twitter.

The post Reinvent the In-store Experience by Unlocking the Power of Data-driven Insights appeared first on IoT@Intel.


Source: Network News

Help us translate our YouTube videos

As we work to create more content for our YouTube channel, making our videos as accessible as possible is key to serving the growing Raspberry Pi community. And as we push to create more videos linked to our collection of free resources, providing translated subtitles will help to bring our content to more people across the globe.

We need your help to make this happen.

YouTube translations Raspberry Pi

Subtitles for our ‘Getting started with soldering‘ video translated into Portuguese.

Translating YouTube

We recently enabled translation submissions for all our YouTube content, allowing viewers, subscribers, and members of the community to contribute translated subtitles, descriptions, and titles for all of our videos.

YouTube Subtitle translations Raspberry Pi

Once approved, these translated subtitles are available for all viewers of our videos via the closed captioning button on the navigation bar of every video, while translated descriptions and titles will automatically be shown, based on your location. Anyone who has contributed to the translations is automatically credited in the video’s description.

YouTube translations Raspberry Pi

Thanks Mário!

Our aim is to collect translations of our videos in as many languages as possible, including the original English. While YouTube does a great job of using speech-to-text to create automatic subtitles, these aren’t always correct – especially when the videos feature loud background noises and music – so we need to create subtitles in English too.

Submit your own YouTube translations

If you’d like to contribute subtitles for our YouTube videos, you can do so by heading to the Community Contributions page for our channel. Simply pick a video you’d like to translate and work your way through. The system is very easy to navigate and allows you to manage the timing of subtitles, which is very handy. Once complete, your translation will be sent to us to double check. When we’ve approved it, it will be published. If we find any issues with the translation, we’ll let you know via the Community Contributions page.

YouTube translations Raspberry Pi

A sneaky peak into what we see on the other side

If you find a video that’s already been translated, but you see faults in the language and/or grammar used, you can also correct and improve existing translations.

Thank you

If you contribute a translation to any of our videos, make sure you post a comment for the world to see in the video’s comments section. If you have a Twitter account, leave your username in the comment and we’ll make sure to thank you on the official Raspberry Pi account when we’ve approved your submission.

Thank you to everyone who has contributed so far, and to everyone who is now logging into YouTube to take part. It’s things like this that make our community the best out there.

Thank you.

The post Help us translate our YouTube videos appeared first on Raspberry Pi.


Source: RaspberryPi – IOT Anonimo

Source: Privacy Online


Source: Zologic

HakTip 159 – Linux Terminal 201: Grep and Metacharacters

Today we’re digging into metacharacters with regular expressions and grep!

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Source: Security news


Source: Zologic

Fair use in the digital house of mirrors . . .

Location

United States

In today’s highly digitized world, copyright infringement actions, among others, are often brought against alleged infringers using information culled from Internet service provider addresses. While fair use defenses may exist against such suits, particularly when one is doing a music mash up, a preliminary question is whether the initial source evidence is accurate.

There exist technologies wherein users can mask themselves behind other users’ Internet service provider addresses. In this way, one can be located in Timbuktu, for example, and use an Internet service provider address of a user in the North Pole. By doing such masking, some users seek to avoid infringement lawsuits by using the address of another user, in essence leaving them with the hot infringement potato.

In prosecuting civil actions for unlawful downloads of Microsoft software, for example, it becomes imperative to understand such masking methods, and their limits. Prima facie evidence of the source of the infringement, while good for the initial stages of litigation, will evaporate upon further investigation. In some cases, a case brought without sufficient evidence of the source can, upon written documentary notice that the user wasn’t responsible for the download, such as via browser history evidence, lead to a motion for sanctions against plaintiff’s counsel for bringing a frivolous case.

Even with such evidence as to source, due attention needs to be paid to the transformative nature of the use. In digital music mash ups, for example, a sample a Bob Dylan recording can be modified, and blended into a new piece, so that the old version becomes impossible to recognize. In this case, the defendant likely has a bona fide fair use defense even when the attribution of the source is correct.

Thus, in prosecuting a copyright infringement action, proper steps need to be made at the outset so that a sustainable case can be made.

Related Projects: 


Source: Cyber Law

Source: Privacy Online


Source: Zologic

Fair use in the house of mirrors . . .

Location

United States

In today’s highly digitized world, copyright infringement actions, among others, are often brought against alleged infringers using information culled from Internet service provider addresses. While fair use defenses may exist against such suits, particularly when one is doing a music mash up, a preliminary question is whether the initial source evidence is accurate.

There exist technologies wherein users can mask themselves behind other users’ Internet service provider addresses. In this way, one can be located in Timbuktu, for example, and use an Internet service provider address of a user in the North Pole. By doing such masking, some users seek to avoid infringement lawsuits by using the address of another user, in essence leaving them with the hot infringement potato.

In prosecuting civil actions for unlawful downloads of Microsoft software, for example, it becomes imperative to understand such masking methods, and their limits. Prima facie evidence of the source of the infringement, while good for the initial stages of litigation, will evaporate upon further investigation. In some cases, a case brought without sufficient evidence of the source can, upon written documentary notice that the user wasn’t responsible for the download, such as via browser history evidence, lead to a motion for sanctions against plaintiff’s counsel for bringing a frivolous case.

Even with such evidence as to source, due attention needs to be paid to the transformative nature of the use. In digital music mash ups, for example, a sample a Bob Dylan recording can be modified, and blended into a new piece, so that the old version becomes impossible to recognize. In this case, the defendant likely has a bona fide fair use defense even when the attribution of the source is correct.

Thus, in prosecuting a copyright infringement action, proper steps need to be made at the outset so that a sustainable case can be made.

Related Projects: 


Source: Cyber Law

Source: Privacy Online


Source: Zologic

The Pronunciation Training Machine

Using a Raspberry Pi, an Arduino, an Adafruit NeoPixel Ring and a servomotor, Japanese makers HomeMadeGarbage produced this Pronunciation Training Machine to help their parents distinguish ‘L’s and ‘R’s when speaking English.

L R 発音矯正ギブス お母ちゃん編 Pronunciation training machine #right #light #raspberrypi #arduino #neopixel

23 Likes, 1 Comments – Home Made Garbage (@homemadegarbage) on Instagram: “L R 発音矯正ギブス お母ちゃん編 Pronunciation training machine #right #light #raspberrypi #arduino #neopixel”

How does an Pronunciation Training Machine work?

As you can see in the video above, the machine utilises the Google Cloud Speech API to recognise their parents’ pronunciation of the words ‘right’ and ‘light’. Correctly pronounce the former, and the servo-mounted arrow points to the right. Pronounce the later and the NeoPixel Ring illuminates because, well, you just said “light”.

An image showing how the project works - English Pronunciation TrainingYou can find the full code for the project on its hackster page here.

Variations on the idea

It’s a super-cute project with great potential, and the concept could easily be amended for other training purposes. How about using motion sensors to help someone learn their left from their right?

A photo of hands with left and right written on them - English Pronunciation Training

Wait…your left or my left?
image c/o tattly

Or use random.choice to switch on LEDs over certain images, and speech recognition to reward a correct answer? Light up a picture of a cat, for example, and when the player says “cat”, they receive a ‘purr’ or a treat?

A photo of a kitten - English Pronunciation Training

Obligatory kitten picture
image c/o somewhere on the internet!

Raspberry Pi-based educational aids do not have to be elaborate builds. They can use components as simple as a servo and an LED, and still have the potential to make great improvements in people’s day-to-day lives.

Your own projects

If you’ve created an educational tool using a Raspberry Pi, we’d love to see it. The Raspberry Pi itself is an educational tool, so you’re helping it to fulfil its destiny! Make sure you share your projects with us on social media, or pop a link in the comments below. We’d also love to see people using the Pronunciation Training Machine (or similar projects), so make sure you share those too!

A massive shout out to Artie at hackster.io for this heads-up, and for all the other Raspberry Pi projects he sends my way. What a star!

The post The Pronunciation Training Machine appeared first on Raspberry Pi.


Source: RaspberryPi – IOT Anonimo

Source: Privacy Online


Source: Zologic

TekThing 139 – Eufy Genie vs Echo Dot, CrashPlan Alternatives, FING Finds Everything On Your Network!

$35 Eufy Genie vs $50 Echo Dot, Cheap 4K Monitor, Replace CrashPlan, FING Finds Everything On Your Network, Eclipse Fun!
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00:46 Eufy Genie: Anker makes a $35 Echo Dot
Can Anker’s new $35 Eufy Genie deliver Alexa as well as Amazon’s $50 Echo Dot? Watch the viceo to find out!
http://amzn.to/2vX44IG
https://www.eufylife.com/pages/eufy-genie

07:23 CrashPlan Panic
CrashPlan is cancelling their online backup service for consumers, CrashPlan for Home. How long do you have? What should you replace it with? We’ve got answers in the video!

Next Steps

13:35 FING: Find everything on your network!
Fing is a fast -free- Network IP Scanner that runs on Android and iOS. Finding everything attached to your network is its primary purpose, but it does some other useful things, too. Watch the video for our review!

The Best Free Network Scanner for iOS and Android – Fing

16:58 Cheap 4K Desktop Monitor!
Blake waned a high resolution 4K desktop monitor, but didn’t want to spend thousands. Find out how he got a 4K monitor for $650 in the video! (Our pick for a 4K HDR TV if you don’t want to spends $3000? TCLs 2017 55P607 55-Inch 4K Ultra HD Roku Smart LED
http://amzn.to/2vp2QSO

20:55 Downloading Google Maps: Snake Storm Edition!
Dave, a correspondent for the Weather Channel, writes, “I wanted to share another great use for Google Maps offline.” Find out how he managed to create an interactive map tracking venomous snakes in Sri Lanka -without- cell phone coverage in the video!
http://bit.ly/SnakeStormMap

22:48 Do Something Analog
Shannon and Patrick went to see the eclipse!!! We talk about 100% totality, have information on how you can donate your glasses (they’ll be no good in three years!), more photo help, and Anthony’s instagram video with Shannon’s reaction!
http://astronomerswithoutborders.org/
http://www.mreclipse.com/SEphoto/SEphoto.html

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Thank You Patrons! Without your support via patreon.com/tekthing, we wouldn’t be able to make the show for you every week!
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Source: Security news


Source: Zologic

Stealing Cryptocurrency, Spyware in Android Apps, and Dreamhost vs. DOJ – Threat Wire

Cryptocurrency is being stolen with phone numbers, dreamhost was compelled to turn over data, and android had a slew of spyware apps. All that coming up now on ThreatWire.

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Links:

How hackers are hijacking mobile phone numbers to grab wallets

http://thehill.com/policy/cybersecurity/346544-dreamhost-claims-doj-requesting-info-on-visitors-to-anti-trump-website

We Fight for the Users

Narrowing the Scope

A Win for Privacy Is a Win for the Web

https://www.dreamhost.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/DH-Search-Warrant.pdf
https://www.dreamhost.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/DH-DOJMotiontoShowCause.pdf
https://assets.documentcloud.org/documents/3939670/8-22-17-US-Reply-Brief-DreamHost.pdf
https://www.cnet.com/news/feds-pare-back-demands-for-data-from-anti-trump-protest-site/
https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2017/08/feds-drop-demand-for-1-3-million-ip-addresses-that-visited-anti-trump-site/

https://thehackernews.com/2017/08/android-spyware-malware.html
https://www.android.com/play-protect/
https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2017/08/500-google-play-apps-with-100-million-downloads-had-spyware-backdoor/
https://blog.lookout.com/igexin-malicious-sdk

Youtube Thumbnail credit:
http://maxpixel.freegreatpicture.com/static/photo/1x/Bitcoin-Crypto-Currency-Electronic-Cyber-Finance-2057405.jpg

Source: Security news


Source: Zologic