How Rogue Ales Makes a Great Beer from Wet Hops, Clean Water and Innovation

Rogue beers

The challenge is local and global. The world has a major perishables problem. A full 30 percent of all perishable produce and products never make it all the way from the farm to the table. For Rogue Ales in Newport, Ore., that means that some of their hops can’t be used in the best way possible, which means they can’t produce the best beer possible.

Intel has become a key ingredient in delivering fresh goods through more efficient supply chain tracking tools and management.

For the US and the world, that means less theft, less rotting and better food. For Rogue, that means fresher hops and better beer.

Hoppy Hazards

Fresh goods and efficient supply chain

Rogue produces hops meant to be used in brewing “fresh hop” or “wet hop” beers. In other words, the hops are not dried in the field but are shipped quickly for immediate use in breweries. In fact, these hops have to be dropped into a vat of beer within 12 hours of harvest, or they start to go bad.

And fresh hops can be more hazardous than you might expect. If they overheat, the volatile oils with which the brewer infuses them can infiltrate the beer and produce an “off” flavor. Think about how lovely compost smells as it decomposes. Who’d want to drink that?

Connected Reporting

Hops being shipped

Enter the Intel Connected Logistics Platform. Rogue learned that this platform is used in the shipping of 1.1 billion units of products to 24 warehouses in 68 countries worldwide. Logistics experts rely on Intel technology because the platform brings clear visibility on each shipment, helping them see exactly where the freight is and what condition it’s in.

Intel’s multifaceted tracking strategy empowers shippers to look at data on each shipment, immediately react to that data, and optimize around that data, helping future shipments arrive on time with minimal losses. All these insights are driven by Edge Intelligence, powered by a quad core processor inside of each gateway, which can deliver data whether it’s connected or not.

Saving the Hops

Using the Intel Connected Logistics Platform, Rogue set out to collect temperature and humidity data on its shipments of hops, at every stage between the hop yard and the brewery. Intel’s sensors tracked each shipment’s location via GPS and noted whether temperature or humidity rose above or below acceptable boundaries.

With the help of nearly real-time data on each step of the transit process, Intel Connected Logistics Platform has given Rogue the power to take diligent care of each shipment of wet hops. After the hop harvest process, each shipment gateway is tagged with three tags per bin – one at the top, one in the middle, and one at the bottom – to ensure comprehensive tracking from the harvest all the way to the brewing vat.

As a result of Intel’s in-depth tracking, Rogue’s shipments of hops now stay more consistently fresh. The proof is in the hops: Take a taste, and see for yourself.

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Source: Network News