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Pioneers winners: Make it outdoors challenge

To everyone’s surprise, the sun has actually managed to show its face this summer in Britain! So we’re not feeling too guilty for having asked the newest crop of Pioneers to Make it outdoors. In fact, the 11- to 16-year-olds that took part in our second digital making challenge not only made things that celebrate the outdoors – some of them actually carted their entire coding setup into the garden. Epic!

The winners

Winners of the second Pioneers challenge are…

We asked you to make it outdoors with tech, challenging all our Pioneers to code and build awesome projects that celebrate the outside world. And we were not disappointed! Congratulations to everyone who took part. Every entry was great and we loved them all.

We set the challenge to Make it outdoors, and our theme winners HH Squared really delivered! You best captured the spirit of what our challenge was asking with your fabulous, fun-looking project which used the outdoors to make it a success. HH Squared, we loved Pi Spy so much that we may have to make our own for Pi Towers! Congratulations on winning this award.

Watching all the entry videos, our judges had the tricky task of picking the top of the pops from among the projects. In additon to ‘theme winner’, we had a number of other categories to help make their job a little bit easier:

  • We appreciate what you’re trying to do: We know that when tackling a digital making project, time and tech sometimes aren’t in your favour. But we still want to see what you’ve got up to, and this award category recognises that even though you haven’t fully realised your ambition yet, you’ve made a great start. *And*, when you do finish, we think it’s going to be awesome. Congratulations to the UTC Bullfrogs for winning this award – we can’t wait to see the final project!
  • Inspiring journey: This category recognises that getting from where you’ve started to where you want to go isn’t always smooth sailing. Maybe teams had tech problems, maybe they had logistical problems, but the winners of this award did a great job of sharing the trials and tribulations they encountered along the way! Coding Doughnuts, your project was a little outside the box IN a box. We loved it.
  • Technically brilliant: This award is in recognition of some serious digital making chops. Robot Apocalypse Committee, you owned this award. Get in!
  • Best explanation: Digital making is an endeavour that involves making a thing, and then sharing that thing. The winners of this category did a great job of showing us exactly what they made, and how they made it. They also get bonus points for making a highly watchable, entertaining video. Uniteam, we got it. We totally got it! What a great explanation of such a wonderful project – and it made us laugh too. Well done!

The Judges’ Special Recognition Awards

Because we found it so hard to just pick five winners, the following teams will receive our Judges’ Special Recognition Award:

  • PiChasers with their project Auqa (yes, the spelling is intentional!)
  • Sunscreen Superstars, making sure we’re all protected in the glorious British sunshine
  • Off The Shelf and their ingenious Underwater Canal Scanner
  • Glassbox, who made us all want Nerf guns thanks to their project Tin Can Alley
  • Turtle Tamers, ensuring the well-being of LEGO turtles around the world with their project Umbrella Empire

Winners from both our Make us laugh and Make it outdoors challenges will be joining us at Google HQ for a Pioneers summer camp full of making funtimes! They’ll also receive some amazing prizes to help them continue in their digital making adventures.

Massive thanks go to our judges for helping to pick the winners!

Pioneers Make it Outdoors Raspberry Pi

And for your next Pioneers challenge…

Ha, as if we’re going to tell you just yet – we’re still recovering from this challenge! We’ll be back in September to announce the theme of the next cycle – so make sure to sign up for our newsletter to be reminded closer to the time.

The post Pioneers winners: Make it outdoors challenge appeared first on Raspberry Pi.


Source: RaspberryPi – IOT Anonimo

Source: Privacy Online


Source: Zologic

Visual Privacy Management in User Centric Open Environments (VISION) project presents scientific paper at Annual Privacy Forum 2017

The Horizon 2020 project ‘VisiOn’ participated in the Annual Privacy Forum 2017, one of the biggest events at E.U. level in the field of privacy and data protection, and presented a scientific paper entitled “Privacy Data Management and Awareness for Public Administrations: a Case Study from the Healthcare Domain”.
Source: Cybersecurity and digital privacy newsletter

Source: Privacy Online


Source: Zologic

The Heart of Maker Faire

We at the Raspberry Pi Foundation find it incredibly rewarding to help people make and share things they love. It’s amazing to be part of an incredibly creative community of makers. And we’re not the only ones who feel this way: for this year’s Maker Faire UK, the team over at NUSTEM created the Heart of Maker Faire, a Pi-powered art installation that is a symbol of this unique community. And to be perfectly frank, it’s bloody gorgeous.

The Heart of Maker Faire

NUSTEM’s new installation for Maker Faire UK 2017, held on 1st & 2nd April at the Centre for Life, Newcastle-upon-Tyne. Visitors wrote notes about things they love, and sealed them in jars. They then read their heart rates, and used the control boxes to associate their jar and heart rate with a space on the shelves.

A heart for the community

NUSTEM is a STEM outreach organisation from Northumbria University, and the makers there are always keen to build interactive projects that get people excited about technology. So at this year’s Faire, attendees passing their installation were invited to write down something close to their heart, put that note in a jar, and measure their heart rate. Then they could connect their heart rate, via a QR code, to a space on a shelf lined with LEDs. Once they placed the jar in their space, the LEDs started blinking to imitate their heart beat. With this art piece, the NUSTEM team wants to say something about “how we’re all individuals, but about our similarities too”.

NUSTEM on Twitter

Still beating. Heart of #MakerFaireUK

Making the heart beat

This is no small build – it uses more than 2,000 NeoPixel LEDs, as well as five Raspberry Pis, among other components. Two Pi 3s are in charge of registering people’s contributions and keeping track of their jars. A Pi Zero W acts as a central hub, connecting its bigger siblings via WiFi, and storing a MySQL database of the jars’ data. Finally, two more Pi 3s control the LEDs of the Heart via a script written in Processing. The NUSTEM team has made the code available here for you “to laugh at” (their words, not mine!)

Heart of Maker Faire shelf

The heart, ready to be filled with love

A heart for art

Processing is an open-source programming language used to create images, graphs, and animations. It can respond to keyboard and mouse input, so you can write games with it as well. Moreover, it runs on the Pi, and you can use it to talk to the Pi’s GPIO pins, as the Heart of Maker Faire team did. Hook up buttons, sensors, and LEDs, and get ready to create amazing interactive pieces of art! If you’d like to learn more, read Matt’s blog post, or watch the talk he gave about Processing at our fifth birthday party earlier this year.

Matt Richardson: Art with Processing on the Raspberry Pi – Raspberry Pi Birthday Event 2017 – Talks

Matt Richardson: Art with Processing on the Raspberry Pi Sunday 5th March 2017 Raspberry Pi Birthday Event 2017 Filmed and edited by David and Andrew Ferguson. This video is not an official video published by the Raspberry Pi Foundation. No copyright infringement intended.

To help you get started, we’re providing a free learning resource introducing you to the basics of Processing. We’d love to see what you create, so do share a link to your masterworks in the comments!

World Maker Faire

We’ll be attending World Maker Faire in New York on the 23rd and 24th of September. Will you be there?

The post The Heart of Maker Faire appeared first on Raspberry Pi.


Source: RaspberryPi – IOT Anonimo

Source: Privacy Online


Source: Zologic

Industrial Internet Creating Transformational Business Value

This is the second in a two-part blog series on trends in next-generation digital efficiency. In part one, I wrote about how commercial fleet vehicle management systems can drive efficiency while reducing CO2 emissions. To learn more, check out the eBook we created in partnership with GE Ecomagination titled “Digital Efficiency: Driving Decarbonization and Unlocking Business Value Across Industries.”

One of the most pressing global economic challenges today is the global productivity slowdown. That’s why I’m excited to share how the Industrial Internet has made marked advances resulting in both economic and environmental benefits, demonstrating the potential of what is to come as new solutions are developed, deployed and scaled across industries. There’s never been a more promising time for global, industrial digitization solutions.

 

Improving Digital Efficiency

Numers superimposed on a piece of machinery to represent a smart factory.

For most industrial segments, improving the efficiency of industrial machines by a mere 1 percent used to require a dedicated new technology introduction cycle that can take up to 10 years to develop. Today, thanks to the Industrial Internet, benefits are exceeding far beyond the traditional 1 percent target, without a lengthy technology introduction cycle or replacing hardware.

The industrial sector accounts for the largest share of energy consumption delivered and accounts for more than half of total delivered energy. This is why the Industrial Internet is transformative and opens the door to accelerated resource productivity and reduced environmental impact across global industrial systems such as power generation, oil and gas, aviation and rail transportation.

 

Renewable Energy: GE’s Brilliant Wind Farm

People in T-shirts and hardhats check out a laptop while wind turbines twirl across the landscape.

One of my favorite examples of the transformational change capable with the Industrial Internet is seen in the way GE’s PowerUp Platform has been extended to enable GE Digital Wind Farm. With this solution, GE extends analytics and optimization beyond a single wind turbine to the entire wind farm. GE harnessed the power of the emerging Industrial Internet to create the Digital Wind Farm, a dynamic connected and adaptable wind energy platform that pairs wind turbines in a wind farm with digital infrastructure to optimize efficiency across the entire wind farm. The GE Digital Wind Farm solution generates up to 20 percent more energy output thanks to the GE Predix-ready gateway with Intel technology.

This platform can account for the wind farm’s topology, surrounding geography, wake effects, and other inputs to control individual wind turbines and optimize the operation as a whole. Through these techniques, the Digital Wind Farm technology boosts a wind farm’s energy production by up to 20 percent and could help generate up to an estimated $50 billion value for the wind industry. The Digital Wind Farm uses interconnected digital technology to address a long-standing need for greater flexibility in renewable power.

 

The Future Looks Bright

A woman examines rows of light-emitting diodes (LEDs).

As seen with GE’s Digital Wind Farm solution, Intel processors underline GE’s Predix solutions and provide both high power and flexibility. Powerful processors embedded in machines allow for software developed on Predix to run at the most effective point, embedded either in operations or in the cloud. Scaling out other solutions across industries in this manner, the combination of GE software and Intel hardware will provide the foundation for digital efficiency by enabling the development of Industrial Internet applications that provide the full range of potential economic and environmental benefits.

To be sure, a new world of possibilities is being unlocked through the Industrial Internet and digital solutions currently available and under development are just the tip of the iceberg. At GE and Intel, we are excited about the opportunity to play a role in helping to confront global resource challenges and accelerate the pathway to the low-carbon economy using digital technologies. The future has just begun and the best is yet to come.

To stay informed about Intel IoT developments, subscribe to our RSS feed for email notifications of blog updates, or visit intel.com/IoTLinkedInFacebook and Twitter.

The post Industrial Internet Creating Transformational Business Value appeared first on IoT@Intel.


Source: Network News

Taking the first step on the journey

This column is from The MagPi issue 58. You can download a PDF of the full issue for free, or subscribe to receive the print edition in your mailbox or the digital edition on your tablet. All proceeds from the print and digital editions help the Raspberry Pi Foundation achieve its charitable goals.

About five years ago was the first time I unboxed a Raspberry Pi. I hooked it up to our living room television and made space on the TV stand for an old USB keyboard and mouse. Watching the $35 computer boot up for the first time impressed me, and I had a feeling it was a big deal, but I’ll admit that I had no idea how much of a phenomenon Raspberry Pi would become. I had no idea how large the community would grow. I had no idea how much my life would be changed from that moment on. And it all started with a simple first step: booting it up.

Matt Richardson on Twitter

Finally a few minutes to experiment with @Raspberry_Pi! So far, I’m rather impressed!

The key to the success of Raspberry Pi as a computer – and, in turn, a community and a charitable foundation – is that there’s a low barrier to the first step you take with it. The low price is a big reason for that. Whether or not to try Raspberry Pi is not a difficult decision. Since it’s so affordable, you can just give it a go, and see how you get along.

The pressure is off

Linus Torvalds, the creator of the Linux operating system kernel, talked about this in a BBC News interview in 2012. He explained that a lot of people might take the first step with Raspberry Pi, but not everyone will carry on with it. But getting more people to take that first step of turning it on means there are more people who potentially will be impacted by the technology. Torvalds said:

I find things like Raspberry Pi to be an important thing: trying to make it possible for a wider group of people to tinker with computers. And making the computers cheap enough that you really can not only afford the hardware at a big scale, but perhaps more important, also afford failure.

In other words, if things don’t work out with you and your Raspberry Pi, it’s not a big deal, since it’s such an affordable computer.

In this together

Of course, we hope that more and more people who boot up a Raspberry Pi for the first time will decide to continue experimenting, creating, and learning with it. Thanks to improvements to the hardware, the Raspbian operating system, and free software packages, it’s constantly becoming easier to do many amazing things with this little computer. And our continually growing community means you’re not alone on this journey. These improvements and growth over the past few years hopefully encourage more people who boot up Raspberry Pis to keep exploring.
raspberry pi first step

The first step

However, the important thing is that people are given the opportunity to take that first step, especially young people. Young learners are at a critical age, and something like the Raspberry Pi can have an enormously positive impact on the rest of their lives. It’s a major reason why our free resources are aimed at young learners. It’s also why we train educators all over the world for free. And encouraging youngsters to take their first step with Raspberry Pi could not only make a positive difference in their lives, but also in society at large.

With the affordable computational power, excellent software, supportive community, and free resources, you’re given everything you need to make a big impact in the world when you boot up a Raspberry Pi for the first time. That moment could be step one of ten, or one of ten thousand, but it’s up to you to take that first step.

Now you!

Learning and making things with the Pi is incredibly easy, and we’ve created numerous resources and tutorials to help you along. First of all, check out our hardware guide to make sure you’re all set up. Next, you can try out Scratch and Python, our favourite programming languages. Feeling creative? Learn to code music with Sonic Pi, or make visual art with Processing. Ready to control the real world with your Pi? Create a reaction game, or an LED adornment for your clothing. Maybe you’d like to do some science with the help of our Sense HAT, or become a film maker with our camera?

You can do all this with the Raspberry Pi, and so much more. The possibilities are as limitless as your imagination. So where do you want to start?

The post Taking the first step on the journey appeared first on Raspberry Pi.


Source: RaspberryPi – IOT Anonimo

Source: Privacy Online


Source: Zologic

Ultrasonic pi-ano

At the Raspberry Pi Foundation, we love a good music project. So of course we’re excited to welcome Andy Grove‘s ultrasonic piano to the collection! It is a thing of beauty… and noise. Don’t let the name fool you – this build can do so much more than sound like a piano.

Ultrasonic Pi Piano – Full Demo

The Ultrasonic Pi Piano uses HC-SR04 ultrasonic sensors for input and generates MIDI instructions that are played by fluidsynth. For more information: http://theotherandygrove.com/projects/ultrasonic-pi-piano/

What’s an ultrasonic piano?

What we have here, people of all genders, is really a theremin on steroids. The build’s eight ultrasonic distance sensors detect hand movements and, with the help of an octasonic breakout board, a Raspberry Pi 3 translates their signals into notes. But that’s not all: this digital instrument is almost endlessly customisable – you can set each sensor to a different octave, or to a different instrument.

octasonic breakout board

The breakout board designed by Andy

Andy has implemented gesture controls to allow you to switch between modes you have preset. In his video, you can see that holding your hands over the two sensors most distant from each other changes the instrument. Say you’re bored of the piano – try a xylophone! Not your jam? How about a harpsichord? Or a clarinet? In fact, there are 128 MIDI instruments and sound effects to choose from. Go nuts and compose a piece using tuba, ocarina, and the noise of a guitar fret!

How to build the ultrasonic piano

If you head over to Instructables, you’ll find the thorough write-up Andy has provided. He has also made all his scripts, written in Rust, available on GitHub. Finally, he’s even added a video on how to make a housing, so your ultrasonic piano can look more like a proper instrument, and less like a pile of electronics.

Ultrasonic Pi Piano Enclosure

Uploaded by Andy Grove on 2017-04-13.

Make your own!

If you follow us on Twitter, you may have seen photos and footage of the Raspberry Pi staff attending a Pi Towers Picademy. Like Andy*, quite a few of us are massive Whovians. Consequently, one of our final builds on the course was an ultrasonic theremin that gave off a sound rather like a dying Dalek. Take a look at our masterwork here! We loved our make so much that we’ve since turned the instructions for building it into a free resource. Go ahead and build your own! And be sure to share your compositions with us in the comments.

Sonic the hedgehog is feeling the beat

Sonic is feeling the groove as well

* He has a full-sized Dalek at home. I know, right?

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Source: RaspberryPi – IOT Anonimo

Source: Privacy Online


Source: Zologic

When Companies Get Hacked, Should They Be Allowed to Hack Back?

Patrick Lin, a professor of philosophy at California Polytechnic State University, has finer-grained logistical concerns about any legislation that opens up the possibility of hacking back, regardless of what one makes of whether it is justified or not. “It is much too premature to allow for hacking back, even if the practice isn’t immoral,” Lin says. “At minimum, there needs to be a clear process to authorize or post-hoc review cyber counterattacks to ensure they’re justified, including penalties for irresponsible attacks. That oversight infrastructure hasn’t even been sketched out.” (There’s little discussion of such oversight in the current discussion draft of the ACDC, though under the most recent draft, released in May, companies would be required to report their activities to the FBI.)”

Location

United States
Date published: 
July 14, 2017
Focus Area: 
People: 
Related Topics: 


Source: Cyber Law

Source: Privacy Online


Source: Zologic

TekThing 133 – World’s Best Keyboard Back? Ping, Traceroute, MTR Find Internet Problems, HD or NAS, Net Neutrality

Worlds Best Keyboard? Ubuntu Windows App. Net Neutrality. HD or NAS, 3 Free tools find where your ‘Net is slow!
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Eclipse Prep
The Eclipse is coming… don’t wait too late to order glasses, and, yes, we’re working on Solar photography with cell phones!
http://amzn.to/2tbK3cQ

Ubuntu. The Windows Store App
Yup, Ubuntu Linux is a Windows app now, but it’s a little tricky to install. Find out why (and how) in the video!
https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/store/p/ubuntu/9nblggh4msv6

Net Neutrality Fight
Net Neutrality… is pretty much dead and gone in 60 days, but we’re still stoked about the BattleForTheNet.com protest on July 12th. Find out why in the video. https://www.battleforthenet.com/

SSD/HD… why not SSD/NAS?
CJ wrote ask@tekthing.com, “I used to do the smaller SSD for programs and larger HDD for data but ever since I built my NAS I’ve been using just SSDs in my systems. I know you both have mentioned having a NAS so I’m curious why you don’t recommend moving data off of the system to the NAS and using a smaller SSD for the system?” Our answers in the video!

Ping, Traceroute, MTR
Want to find out why a website (or everything) on your Internet is running slow? Three tools can help tons: Ping, Traceroute, and MTR. We show how to use ’em, Shannon adds a Netstat demo on Linux (and mentions Wireshark). WinMTR.net is the place to get WinMTR for Windows, and Linode has help analyzing MTR results!
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ping_(networking_utility)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traceroute
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MTR_(software)
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW5y1tjAOzI30OkWG_rhUstdJTk1FgU2W
http://winmtr.net/download-winmtr/
https://www.linode.com/docs/networking/diagnostics/diagnosing-network-issues-with-mtr#analyzing-mtr-reports

Drone Registration Deletion
Drone registration has been struck down by the courts… but you’re gonna have to jump through some hoops to get your information deleted off the website and your $5 back!
http://www.ainonline.com/aviation-news/general-aviation/2017-07-03/faa-offers-delete-names-refund-drone-hobbyists
https://www.faa.gov/uas/getting_started/registration_deletion/

New Model F Keyboards
Crashbox tweets, “@patricknorton I’m assuming you’ve already seen this and laid your money down,” with a link to modelfkeyboards.com project to produce -new- Model F keyboards, the legendary predecessor to the Model M. We discuss what makes ’em great in the video. (For Model M, check: clickykeyboards.com, phosophorglow.net, and, yes, Unicomp still makes new buckling spring keyboards!)
https://twitter.com/Crashbox/status/884075884583452672
https://www.modelfkeyboards.com/
http://clickykeyboards.com/
http://phosphorglow.net/model-m-add-ons/
http://www.pckeyboard.com/page/category/UltraClassic

Do Something Analog
Like Jack who writes, “My something analog today was relaxing on the back porch before dinner.” Jack’s view is pretty epic!
——
Thank You Patrons! Without your support via patreon.com/tekthing, we wouldn’t be able to make the show for you every week!
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Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/c/tekthing
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HakShop: https://hakshop.myshopify.com/
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SOCIAL IT UP!
Twitter: https://twitter.com/tekthing
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TekThing
Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/tekthingers
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Source: Security news


Source: Zologic

Hak5 2218 – Story Time – Hack Across the Planet

HackAcrossThePlanet.com for more info!

——————————-
Shop: http://www.hakshop.com
Support: http://www.patreon.com/threatwire
Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/hak5
Our Site: http://www.hak5.org
Contact Us: http://www.twitter.com/hak5
Threat Wire RSS: https://shannonmorse.podbean.com/feed/
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Help us with Translations! http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?tab=2&c=UC3s0BtrBJpwNDaflRSoiieQ
——————————

Source: Security news


Source: Zologic

Raspberry Pi Certified Educators shine at ISTE 2017

Everything’s bigger in Texas, including the 2017 ISTE Conference & Expo, which saw over 20,000 educators convene in San Antonio earlier this summer. As a new Raspberry Pi Foundation team member, I was thrilled to meet the many Raspberry Pi Certified Educators (RCEs) in attendance. They came from across the country to share their knowledge, skills, and advice with fellow educators interested in technology and digital making.

This is the only GIF. Honest.

Meet the RCEs

Out of the dozens of RCEs who attended, here are three awesome members of our community and their ISTE 2017 stories:

Nicholas Provenzano, Makerspace Director at University Liggett School and the original nerdy teacher, shared his ideas for designing innovative STEAM and maker projects. He also knocked our socks off by building his own digital badge using a Raspberry Pi Zero to stream tweets from the conference.

Andrew Collins on Twitter

What’s up w/ @Raspberry_Pi & digital making? Serious knowledge dropping at #ISTE17 #picademy

Amanda Haughs, TOSA Digital Innovation Coach in Campbell Union School District and digital learning champion, shared her ideas for engaging elementary school learners in technology and digital making. She also went next level with her ISTE swag, creating a wearable Raspberry Pi tote bag combining sewing and circuitry.

Amanda Haughs on Twitter

New post: “Pi Tote– a sewing and circuitry project w/the @Raspberry_Pi Zero W” https://t.co/Fb1IFZMH1n #picademy #Maker #ISTE17 #PiZeroW

Rafranz Davis, Executive Director of Professional and Digital Learning for Lufkin ISD and edtech leader extraordinaire, shared her vision for making innovation and digital learning more equitable and accessible for all. She also received the ISTE 2017 Award for Outstanding Leadership in recognition of her innovative work in education and in advancing student-driven learning as well as her efforts to promote diversity, equity, and inclusion across learning environments.

EdSurge on Twitter

At #iste17, @rafranzdavis speaks about the privilege of access. How do we make innovation less privileged? #edtechc… https://t.co/6foMzgfE6f

Rafranz, Nicholas, and Amanda are all members of our original Picademy cohorts in the United States. Since summer 2016, more than 300 educators have attended US Picademy events and joined the RCE community. Be on the lookout later this year for our 2018 season events and sign up here for updates.

The Foundation at ISTE 2017

Oh, and the Raspberry Pi Foundation team was also at ISTE 2017 and we’re not too shabby either : ). We held a Raspberry Jam, which saw some fantastic projects from Raspberry Pi Certified Educators — the Raspberry Pi Preserve Jar from Heidi Baynes, Scratch student projects from Bradley Quentin and Kimberly Boyce, and Sense HAT activities with Efren Rodriguez.

But that’s not all we got up to! You can learn more about our team’s presentations — including on how to send a Raspberry Pi to near space — on our ISTE conference page here.

Raspberry Pi on Twitter

Our #ISTE17 crew had a PACKED day in San Antonio. If you didn’t catch them today, see where they’ll be: https://t.co/Rt0ec7PF7S

Join the fold

Inspired by all this education goodness? You can become a Raspberry Pi Certified Educator as well! All you need to do is attend one of our free two-day Picademy courses held across the US and UK. Join this amazing community of more than 1,000 teachers, librarians, and volunteers, and help more people learn about digital making.

If you’re interested in what our RCEs do at Picademy, check out our free online courses. These are available to anyone, and you can use them to learn about teaching coding and physical computing from the comfort of your home.

The post Raspberry Pi Certified Educators shine at ISTE 2017 appeared first on Raspberry Pi.


Source: RaspberryPi – IOT Anonimo

Source: Privacy Online


Source: Zologic